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Using Multiscale Norms to Quantify Mixing and Transport

Small book cover: Using Multiscale Norms to Quantify Mixing and Transport

Using Multiscale Norms to Quantify Mixing and Transport
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 52

Description:
Mixing is relevant to many areas of science and engineering, including the pharmaceutical and food industries, oceanography, atmospheric sciences, and civil engineering. In all these situations one goal is to quantify and often then to improve the degree of homogenisation of a substance being stirred, referred to as a passive scalar or tracer.

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